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Fiber_Nexus: OSPF & MPLS lab

Welcome,I am glad you are here ready to learn a bit more today. I can honestly say learning and remembering all these networking protocols and commands are not easy. The biggest challenge in the real world is time. When you are hired for your first networking job whether its an entry level engineer job or an administrator, quick and timely decisions are very important! When there is an outage and your customers, clients, or even co-workers have no internet or voice service, time is your biggest challenge. You won't have much time to go over your notes to check and find what the issue might be before you have your customers asking for an update and requesting the network to be restored immediately. But at the end of the day, trial and error is the best teacher. With that being said, I wanted to talk about two very important protocols that many ISPs use, MPLS and OSPF. OSPF is the most popular routing protocol because it is not proprietary and it is very flexible. Just to remind new students, these protocols are just "rules" of how you want to route traffic within your network. The same way the streets and highways are designed with off-ramps, traffic lights, left turns, right turns, merges, and you have to follow the law or "rules" according to your city, that is the same way routing protocols are designed. The routers use highways of traffic with rules set in place so traffic can be routed smoothly, safely, and to it's destination. At the end of the day, it's up to you and the company to decide what " rules" you want to implement into your network. The same with MPLS, instead of making the routers verify each packet, it already knows what is the next destination based on its labels. I made this small lab so you can have an idea of how it works and how you can troubleshoot it in real life. Cell Backhaul has a similar setup although it is more advanced and I will add the rest of the configs with VRFs and mBGP next time. It is not the best design of course but at least you have an idea of how it is set up and what the commands look like. My best advice is to create a lab of your own changing the configs so you can practice the CLI commands better. Also, you would need to study and learn basic MPLS and OSPF if you haven't done so through Cisco's book and videos. Youtube and CBT Nuggets also have a lot of videos. In the picture below, that is the way the network is setup in GNS3 using the 7200 Cisco image. You would have to copy and paste each SMOP depending on the ###ROUTER### name and interface. If you are able to use the 7200 image with Gigabit interfaces, this should work smoothly. If not you can edit the SMOP based on what you have. Here are some basic show commands to use. Enjoy this lab!show mpls ldp neighbor show mpls ldp bindings show ip route ospfshow ip ospf int briefshow ip ospf neighborsshow ip ospf int#####ROUTER 1######!hostname nexusR1!ip cef!no ip domain-lookup!!mpls ldp router-id lo 0mpls label range 100 199mpls ip!interface Loopback0 ip address 61.61.1.1 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 60 area 0!!interface gigabitEthernet 1/0 description Connected_nexusR3 ip address 68.86.0.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut!interface gigabitEthernet 3/0 description Connected_nexusR4 ip address 68.86.3.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut !router ospf 60 router-id 61.61.1.1 passive-interface default no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 2/0 no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 3/0 mpls ldp sync mpls ldp autoconfig area 0 log-adjacency-changes area 0 authentication message-digest network 68.86.0.1 0.0.0.0 area 0 network 68.86.3.1 0.0.0.0 area 0 end wr######ROUTER 2######!hostname nexusR2!ip cef!no ip domain-lookup!!mpls ldp router-id lo 0mpls label range 200 299mpls ip!interface Loopback0 ip address 61.61.1.2 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 60 area 0!!interface gigabitEthernet 2/0 description Connected_nexusR3 ip address 68.86.1.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut!interface gigabitEthernet 4/0 description Connected_nexusR4 ip address 68.86.2.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut !router ospf 60 router-id 61.61.1.2 passive-interface default no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 2/0 no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 4/0 mpls ldp sync mpls ldp autoconfig area 0 log-adjacency-changes area 0 authentication message-digest network 68.86.1.1 0.0.0.0 area 0 network 68.86.2.1 0.0.0.0 area 0 end wr#####ROUTER 3#####!hostname nexusR3!ip cef!no ip domain-lookup!!mpls ldp router-id lo 0mpls label range 300 399mpls ip!interface Loopback0 ip address 61.61.1.3 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 60 area 0!!interface gigabitEthernet 2/0 description Connected_nexusR2 ip address 68.86.1.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut!interface gigabitEthernet 1/0 description Connected_nexusR1 ip address 68.86.0.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut !router ospf 60 router-id 61.61.1.3 passive-interface default no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 2/0 no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 1/0 mpls ldp sync mpls ldp autoconfig area 0 log-adjacency-changes area 0 authentication message-digest network 68.86.0.2 0.0.0.0 area 0 network 68.86.1.2 0.0.0.0 area 0 end wr######ROUTER 4##########!hostname nexusR4!ip cef!no ip domain-lookup!!mpls ldp router-id lo 0mpls label range 400 499mpls ip!interface Loopback0 ip address 61.61.1.4 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 60 area 0!!interface gigabitEthernet 3/0 description Connected_nexusR1 ip address 68.86.3.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5  ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut!interface gigabitEthernet 4/0 description Connected_nexusR2 ip address 68.86.2.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 n3xu5 ip ospf hello-interval 5 ip ospf dead-interval 30 ip ospf 60 area 0 mpls ip no shut !router ospf 60 router-id 61.61.1.4 passive-interface default no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 4/0 no passive-interface gigabitEthernet 3/0 mpls ldp sync mpls ldp autoconfig area 0 log-adjacency-changes area 0 authentication message-digest network 68.86.2.2 0.0.0.0 area 0 network 68.86.3.2 0.0.0.0 area 0 end wr

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OSPF Virtual-Links & Point-to-Point

Welcome,I am here thinking of that one time I posted a video on Instagram about Virtual-Links but I did not post an explanation about it. Well today I wanted to give you an idea of what it is and how easy it is to implement. Also, I am throwing in here some Point-to-Point OSPF connections and how they are useful. I see many Point-to-Point OSPF links here at work so I wondered what the benefits are. Let's start off with what is a Virtual-Link. In OSPF, Area 0 is the backbone area of your network and every area must somehow connect to it directly. But what can you do if you add another OSPF area to an area that is not Area 0? Tricking OSPF. You have to make it think that it is directly connected to Area 0 so you must create a tunnel that skips the area between Area 0 and your foreign area. In the topology below, you see that I marked a "blue dotted tunnel" from Area 3, through Area 1, and connecting into Area 0. The way to do that is by adding a simple command to point to each others loopback address in the OSPF process. In this case, I used the command area 1 virtual-link 3.3.3.3 on R2 and area 1 virtual-link 2.2.2.2 on R3. I also added OSPF authentication as you can see. To make sure it works, you must see this notification: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 555, Nbr 3.3.3.3 on OSPF_VL2 from LOADING to FULL, Loading Done. Once you see this adjacency you will be able to advertise traffic from Area 3 across Area 1 into Area 0. In this topology I added 2 Virtual-Links and made sure you can ping from R1 to R6 through several OSPF areas. This would happen if you have too many routers in OSPF Area 0 and Area 1. That is rare but it is good to know this command for your Cisco studies.Now let's talk about Point-to-Point OSPF links. The normal OSPF network you would probably learn from CCENT or CCNA is broadcast OSPF, which means you will have a Dedicated Router and Backup Dedicated Router, DR/BDR. If you see this topology, you might just want to not have a DR/BDR so you force OSPF to point to one direction only. You add the ip ospf network point-to-point command under the interface using OSPF. Now there are more differences between broadcast and point-to-point OSPF networks. Broadcast networks establish an adjacency much slower than point-to-point and generates around 50% more LSAs. This causes slow convergence as you can see in this chart:BROADCASTPOINT-TO-POINTNetwork:                  Hello:      DeadInterval:     Adjacency time:Broadcast                 10s              40s                  40sPoint-to-Point            30s             120s                2sAs you can see, the Hello & Dead Intervals for an OSPF Broadcast network is much faster! but it is much slower to make an adjacency. So how can you tweak that? Well you add the ip ospf network point-to-point command and also ip ospf hello-interval 10 & ip ospf dead-interval 40 commands under the interface. That way you will have the same Hello/DeadInterval time as a Broadcast network and an even better adjacency time than a broadcast network. Tweaking the times would make a Point-to-Point link really fast in all areas. You can see all the in the configs that I posted below regarding Virtual-Links and a Point-to-Point OSPF network. Well hopefully you learned something today and I will see you soon!###ROUTER 1###config t!hostname nexusrouter1!interface Loopback0 ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 555 area 3!interface GigabitEthernet1/0 ip address 78.86.1.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 3 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!router ospf 555 router-id 1.1.1.1 log-adjacency-changes area 3 authentication message-digest passive-interface default no passive-interface GigabitEthernet1/0 network 78.86.1.1 0.0.0.0 area 3 maximum-paths 32 endwr####ROUTER 2####config thostname nexusrouter2!interface Loopback0 ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 555 area 1!interface GigabitEthernet1/0 ip address 78.86.1.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 3 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!interface GigabitEthernet2/0 ip address 68.86.0.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 1 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!router ospf 555 router-id 2.2.2.2 log-adjacency-changes area 1 authentication message-digest area 1 virtual-link 3.3.3.3 authentication message-digest area 3 authentication message-digest network 78.86.1.2 0.0.0.0 area 3 network 68.86.0.2 0.0.0.0 area 1 end wr###ROUTER3###config thostname nexusrouter3!interface Loopback0 ip address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 555 area 0!!interface gigabitethernet3/0 ip address 68.86.4.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 0 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!interface gigabitethernet2/0 ip address 68.86.0.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 1 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!router ospf 555 router-id 3.3.3.3 log-adjacency-changes area 0 authentication message-digest area 1 authentication message-digest area 1 virtual-link 2.2.2.2  network 68.86.0.1 0.0.0.0 area 1 network 68.86.4.1 0.0.0.0 area 0 endwr###ROUTER4###config thostname nexusrouter4!interface Loopback0 ip address 4.4.4.4 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 555 area 0!interface gigabitethernet3/0 ip address 68.86.4.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 0 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!!interface gigabitethernet4/0 ip address 68.86.3.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 2 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!router ospf 555 router-id 4.4.4.4 log-adjacency-changes area 0 authentication message-digest area 2 authentication message-digest area 2 virtual-link 5.5.5.5  network 68.86.3.2 0.0.0.0 area 2 network 68.86.4.2 0.0.0.0 area 0 endwr####ROUTER5####config thostname nexusrouter5!!interface Loopback0 ip address 5.5.5.5 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 555 area 2!!interface gigabitethernet5/0 ip address 78.86.2.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 4 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!interface gigabitethernet4/0 ip address 68.86.3.1 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 2 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!router ospf 555 router-id 5.5.5.5 log-adjacency-changes area 2 authentication message-digest area 2 virtual-link 4.4.4.4 authentication message-digest area 4 authentication message-digest network 68.86.3.1 0.0.0.0 area 2 network 78.86.2.1 0.0.0.0 area 4 endwr###ROUTER6####config thostname nexusrouter6!interface Loopback0 ip address 6.6.6.6 255.255.255.255 ip ospf 555 area 4!!interface GigabitEthernet5/0 ip address 78.86.2.2 255.255.255.252 ip ospf authentication message-digest ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco ip ospf network point-to-point ip ospf 555 area 4 ip ospf hello-interval 10 ip ospf dead-interval 40!!router ospf 555 router-id 6.6.6.6 log-adjacency-changes passive-interface default no passive-interface GigabitEthernet5/0 network 78.86.2.2 0.0.0.0 area 4 maximum-paths 32 endwr

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RFC 2544 Test

Welcome back to my networking blog. I am extremely motivated and happy for having viewers and readers here and that is why I want to continue providing short but valuable information, for example the RFC 2544 Test. I think this topic is very real world and very important for people that are interested in the networking world. At my job there are a lot of RFC tests done during the month. The reason why is because the RFC test is a standard made by the IETF to measure and provide performance data according to the SLAs. First lets start with what is a SLA. Here is a description by Palo Alto Networks: "A service level agreement (SLA) is a contract between a service provider (either internal or external) and the end user that defines the level of service expected from the service provider. SLAs are output-based in that their purpose is specifically to define what the customer will receive. SLAs do not define how the service itself is provided or delivered. The SLA an Internet Service Provider (ISP) will provide its customers is a basic example of an SLA from an external service provider. The metrics that define levels of service for an ISP should aim to guarantee:A description of the service being provided – maintenance of areas such as network connectivity, domain name servers, dynamic host configuration protocol servers Reliability – when the service is available (percentage uptime) and the limits outages can be expected to stay withinResponsiveness – the punctuality of services to be performed in response to requests and scheduled service datesProcedure for reporting problems - who can be contacted, how problems will be reported, procedure for escalation, and what other steps are taken to resolve the problem efficientlyMonitoring and reporting service level – who will monitor performance, what data will be collected and how often as well as how much access the customer is given to performance statisticsConsequences for not meeting service obligations – may include credit or reimbursement to customers, or enabling the customer to terminate the relationship.  Escape clauses or constraints – circumstances under which the level of service promised does not apply. An example could be an exemption from meeting uptime requirements in circumstance that floods, fires or other hazardous situations damage the ISP’s equipment.In covering these areas, the document aims to establish a mutual understanding of services, areas prioritized, responsibilities, guarantees, and warranties provided by the service provider." Now that is when the RFC test comes into play. For example, if Verizon decides to run an RFC test through their network from end-to-end, and it fails, the ISP has to check their SLA, test the network, look for the problem, and if the problem is not found, run the RFC test with the Verizon technician at the same time. The RFC test will measure several things like Throughput, Frame Loss, Burstability, Latency, and Jitter (optional but recommended.) It uses frame sizes minimum of 64 bytes and up to 1518 bytes to stress the network. Usually the Test and Turn up team will run the RFC test before making the site live but in many cases the customers test their networks again to ensure the ISP is meeting the SLA requirements. By the way, Test and Turn up is a department where they test, modify, and ensure that your enterprise internet service will be fully functional and then make your site live and allow the network to pass traffic. The RFC test is very real world and anyone starting from CCENT and up should know the basics of what is involved with a RFC 2544 Test because they will definitely come across it while working as a Network Admin or Network Engineer. So today you now gained valuable real world knowledge, knowing what a RFC 2544 Test is, what a SLA is, and what is Test and Turn up. These 3 things come together in an enterprise environment and knowing the basics will definitely help you in the long run. Thanks for reading and you can email me at [email protected] or DM me on my Instagram account called fiber_nexus.

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